Law Infringements Lead to Suspension of Poker Tournaments in Florida

For years now, growing revenues from poker play at racetracks have been adding millions to Florida’s tax coffers. The surging popularity of Texas Hold ‘em and tournament poker has added even more fuel to the growth of Florida tax earnings, until now.

Recently, some racetracks decided to up the ante and challenge legal limits on amounts wagered in poker play. Initially, state courts didn’t object to the challenge, allowing the Florida state Division of Pari-Mutuel Wagering to increase betting limits at authorized sites. When no-limit wagering at poker tournaments made its debut, however, officials decided to step in and cease all tournament poker activity indefinitely. online gambling

Though cash games (mostly low limit) can still be played at the racetracks, some sites, such as Dania Jai-Alai and Melbourne Greyhound Park, have already started to see a drop in patronage. Other card rooms, particularly in southern Florida, reported no significant changes thus far as a consequence of the legal ruling.

There is tremendous competition for clientèle in the gaming industry, mainly from cruise ships, tribal casinos, and online gambling sites. Understandably, then, the ban on poker tournaments has many Florida card room managers concerned. Most of them, however, are hesitant to contest the issue openly since they have a vested interest in the promotion of gambling in the state. free slot games with bonus

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The Gamble Rogers Festival

For those of you who are planning on attending the 12th Annual Gamble Rogers Folk Festival in St. Augustine, Florida on May 4, 5, and 6 of this year, you may know that this festival showcases a variety of musical talent, ranging from Michael Smith, to The Burns Sisters Band, from Amy Carol Webb, to The Cook Trio. You may also know that this festival offers performances by local musicians, contests, arts and crafts, and discounted local accommodations. What you might not know, however, is the story behind Gamble Rogers. It’s not only a tale of talent and tragedy, but also of uncompromised heroism.

James Gamble Rogers IV was born on the last day of January 1937 in Winter Park, Florida. While his father and grandfather were architectural geniuses, Rogers took a path that led him away from architecture and into the open arms of music. He became a folk singing legend – influencing Jimmy Buffet along the way and leading him to dedicate his album, Fruitcakes, to Rogers.

Called a “national treasure” by journalists, Rogers was well known for his songs about Oklawaha, Florida, a fictional town full of colorful characters and stories. He was also known for his guitar playing and uncanny ability to captivate any audience for which he performed. He reintroduced the art of story telling and served as the proverbial father of Florida Folk Music. He also released several albums, some posthumously. His albums included The Lord Gives Me Grace And The Devil Gives Me Style, Sorry is As Sorry Does, Signs of a Misspent Youth, and Good Causes.

Rogers became most revered not for his musical acts but for his act of bravery, an act that ultimately led to his death. In October of 1991, while camping in Flagler Beach, Florida, Rogers heard someone who needed help. He followed the voice to find a man named Raymond Tracey stuck in rough water. Rogers jumped in and made the ultimate sacrifice: he saved the life of Tracey and lost his own life in the process.

Folk singing, unlike other genres of music, does not belong to the young: many folk singers get better with age. Because of this, Rogers, at the time of his death, seemed to be just getting started, leaving the world of folk music to shake its head and wonder what might have been.

For his musical talent, he was inducted to the Florida Artists Hall of Fame in 1987 and posthumously given a Folk Heritage Award in 1993. For his sacrificing act, Rogers was awarded the Kiwanis Award for bravery and the Carnegie Award for heroism. The area of the beach where Rogers met his death was renamed The Gamble Rogers Memorial State Recreation Area at Flagler, Beach and a school in St. Augustine was renamed The Gamble Rogers Middle School in St. Augustine. Rogers memory, his songs, and tributes to him also live on at the Gamble Rogers Memorial Foundation, a foundation set up with the purpose of never forgetting a legend.

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State Campgrounds on Florida’s East Coast

With all the attractions Florida has to offer, it becomes hard at times to decide which one you may want to do. If the beach is what you are looking for, I recommend camping at one of the State Campgrounds listed below.

Gamble Rodgers Campground at Flagler Beach on A1A is a campground with only thirty four lots. Twenty four of these lots will accommodate any size camper while the rest is best suited for tents, popups, and small campers. Half the lots back up to the Atlantic ocean with most of these having a wonderful view of the ocean. On the North side of the campground is a park with a public beach and picnic area. The ranger station is located on the west side of A1A where there is a picnic area, nature trails, and a boat ramp with access to the Intracoastal Waterway. There is nowhere to ride a bike except on the highway. However, it is only three miles into Flagler Beach which is a good but short bike ride. Gamble Rodgers is an excellent place for the beach lover; however, getting a reservation during beach weather can be hard to do.

Sebastian Inlet State Park located in Melbourne on A1A is divided into two separate parts. South of the inlet is the campground which has over fifty lots that will accommodate most any size camper. Fourteen of these sites have an excellent view of the Sebastian Inlet. This campground is excellent for the fisherman as well as the beach lover. The boat ramp allows for easy access to the Indian River as well as the Atlantic Ocean. Fishing is allowed along the shores of the Inlet as well as the small docks located along the inlet. A short walk east of the campground is the Atlantic Ocean with beautiful beaches for swimming, surfing, and fishing. On the north side of the inlet there is a great place for the younger children to swim in the inlet where there are no currents or surf and the water is shallow. On the ocean side one will find bait and tackle shop, concession stand, bathhouse, and a jetty for fishing.

Little Talbot Island State Park just north of Jacksonville has one of the prettiest beaches along the East coast of Florida. The campground is located on the west side of Heckscher Drive with thirty six sites that are well shaded. Due to the large oak trees this campground has a thirty foot maximum for RV length. Across the road from the campground is five miles of undeveloped beaches, at low tide the sand is packed well enough for bicycle rides along the shore line. In addition, there is a paved road along the island that is great for bicycle riding as well as rollerblading. The nature trail winds through the woods and ends with a spectacular view of the ocean.

Fort Clinch State Park also located just north of Jacksonville at Fernandina Beach has two campgrounds. The circle on the Atlantic Ocean has twenty sites and has no shade, yet they are within easy walking distance to the beaches. The River circle has over thirty lots all under a canopy of oak trees. The campground circles are a little more than three miles apart and have a paved road connecting the two which is great for bike riding or jogging. Also there are several miles of beach that is great for bike riding at low tides.

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